Applied Math Seminar

Pathogen evolution in switching environments: a hybrid dynamical system approach

10/09/2014 - 4:00pm
10/09/2014 - 5:00pm
Speaker: 
Peter Hinow (University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee)
Abstract: 

See attached file.

Where: 
Seely G. Mudd Library, Room 125
Misc. Information: 

 See attached file.

Building predictive models from a terabyte of neurologic data: an application to persuasive narratives

10/27/2014 - 1:15pm
10/27/2014 - 2:15pm
Speaker: 
Paul Zak and Jorge Barraza (Claremont Graduate University)
Abstract: 

Emotionally laden narratives are often used as persuasive appeals by charitable organizations. Physiological responses to a narrative may explain why some people respond to an appeal while others do not. In this study we tested whether autonomic and hormonal activity during a narrative predict subsequent narrative influence via charitable giving. Participants viewed a brief story of a father’s experience with his 2-year-old son who has terminal cancer. After the story, participants were presented with an opportunity to donate some of their study earnings to a related charity. Measures derived from cardiac and electrodermal activity, including HF-HRV, significantly predicted donor status. Time-series GARCH models of physiology during the narrative further differentiated donors from non-donors. Moreover, cardiac activity and experienced concern were found to covary from moment-to-moment across the narrative. Our findings indicate that the physiological response to a stimulus, herein a narrative, can predict influence as indexed by stimulus-related behavior.

Where: 
CGU, Burkle 16 (On 11th Street, now Drucker Way, between College and Dartmouth)

Of Mice and Math: a link from the lab to clinic

09/22/2014 - 1:15pm
09/22/2014 - 2:15pm
Speaker: 
Professor Ami Radunskaya (Pomona College)
Abstract: 

Mathematical models of physical, chemical and behavioral processes can be used to understand the mechanisms behind the process, to hypothesize about how the process can be modified and to predict future behavior. A useful mathematical model can help the laboratory scientist interpret data, and model simulations can suggest ways to translate discoveries into effective clinical treatments. In this talk I will describe several modeling projects with collaborators from the School of Pharmacy at the University of Otago in New Zealand: targeted drug delivery, breaching the blood brain barrier, the effect of anti-coagulants, and virtual mice responding to in silico vaccines.

Where: 
CGU Math South Conference Room, 710 N. College Ave

Organizational Meeting

09/10/2014 - 1:15pm
09/10/2014 - 2:15pm
Speaker: 
Multiple (Claremont Colleges)
Abstract: 

Potential new formats for the applied math seminar are discussed, with the goal of increasing the interactions between researchers in other disciplines and the applied mathematicians at the Claremont Colleges.

Where: 
CGU Math South Conference Room, 710 N. College Ave

Effects of emotion in swarming dynamics

04/30/2014 - 1:15pm
04/30/2014 - 2:15pm
Speaker: 
Jesús Rosado (UCLA)
Abstract: 

We will extend classic swarming models to describe the influence of emotional contagion between the individuals of the group. We'll study them at three different scales: microscopic, kinetic and macroscopic, and see how the study of the continuum limit helps us understand key features of the model.

Where: 
CGU Math South, 710 N. College Ave

Singular Perturbation Analysis of a Turning Point Problem

04/16/2014 - 1:15pm
04/16/2014 - 2:15pm
Speaker: 
Lindsay Skinner (UW Milwaukee, Emeritus)
Abstract: 

I plan to present some elementary singular perturbation theory in connection with some Laplace type integrals and show how it can be used to obtain new asymptotic results for a classic turning point differential equation problem. One of the results is a new, large order Bessel function expansion.

Where: 
CGU Math South, 710 N. College Ave

Mathematical Models of Immune Memory and Vaccination

04/02/2014 - 1:15pm
04/02/2014 - 2:15pm
Speaker: 
Courtney Davis (Pepperdine University)
Abstract: 

My work uses mathematical modeling to investigate dynamics of immunity and, in particular, the establishment and maintenance of immune memory.  I will discuss two biological questions and the mathematics that we have developed and used to address them.  The first question arises from experimental evidence that constraints on the total number of memory T-cells between infections require that some memory to past infections be eliminated to make room for memory to new infections.  We use Markov models and probabilistic calculations to examine memory longevity and to quantify how existing immunity changes as a result of new infections. 

Our second question asks what key immune and bacterial components should be targeted to create an effective vaccine against the bacteria ShigellaShigella, a member of the same family as E. coli, causes 1.1 million deaths every year, mostly in children in developing countries.  No vaccine exists for Shigella despite decades of research and clinical trials, in part because the key immune interactions responsible for conferring immunity against Shigella are not known.  I will describe how we are using delay differential equation models to search for promising Shigella vaccine targets.

Where: 
CGU, Math South Conference Room, 710 N. College Ave

Global Controlled Dynamics

02/12/2014 - 1:15pm
02/12/2014 - 2:15pm
Speaker: 
Makis Kappos (Department of Mathematics, Yasar University, Izmir, Turkey)
Abstract: 

Traditionally, control theory had as its main aim the stabilization of the dynamical behavior of a system, or the improvement of the transient dynamics. This is already a nontrivial problem for nonlinear systems, though the linear case is well understood and elegant. In this talk, we shall go beyond this, to address the problem of designing more complicated dynamical behavior (e.g., multiple equilibria, related among themselves in a particular way, or the creation of limit cycles.) As expected, Lyapunov functions play a role, but the analysis draws from global analysis, differential geometry and topology. We shall give an introduction to these ideas, emphasizing the possibility of bifurcation-like design.

Where: 
CGU, Math South Conference Room, 710 N. College Ave
Misc. Information: 

Speaker's Affiliations: Department of Mathematics, Yasar University, Izmir, Turkey, on leave from Dept of Mathematics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece; Previous appointments include Northeastern U. and Sheffield University and one-year visits to UC Berkeley and Santa Barbara

A geometric theory of convex demixing

10/02/2013 - 1:15pm
10/02/2013 - 2:15pm
Speaker: 
Mike McCoy (Computing and Mathematical Sciences, Caltech)
Abstract: 

Demixing is the problem of disentangling multiple informative signals from a single observation. These problems appear frequently in image processing, wireless communications, machine learning, statistics, and other data-intensive fields. Convex optimization provides a framework for creating tractable demixing procedures that work right out of the box.

In this talk, we describe a geometric theory that characterizes the performance of convex demixing methods under a generic model. This theory precisely identifies when demixing can succeed, and when it cannot, and further indicates that a sharp phase transition between success and failure is a ubiquitous feature of these programs. Our results admit an elegant interpretation: Each signal has an intrinsic dimensionality, and demixing can succeed if (and only if) the number of measurements exceeds the total dimensionality in the signal.

Where: 
Davidson, CMC

Finite-time blow up and long-wave unstable thin-film equations

10/30/2013 - 1:15pm
10/30/2013 - 2:15pm
Speaker: 
Marina Chugunova (CGU)
Abstract: 

We study short-time existence,  long-time existence, finite speed of propagation, and finite-time blow-up of non-negative solutions for long-wave unstable thin-film equations $ h_t = -(h^n h_{xxx})_x - (h^m h_x)_x $ with $ n $>0. We consider a large range of exponents $ (n,m) $ within the super-critical $ m $>$ n+2 $ and critical $ m+2 $ regimes. For the  initial data with negative energy we prove that the solution blows up in finite time with its $ H^1 $ and $ L^\infty $ norms going to infinity. [In collaboration with Mary C. Pugh and Roman M. Taranets]

 

Where: 
Davidson Lecture Hll
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